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  • False Security: Is Your Will Legally Valid?

    A last will and testament can ensure your wishes are respected when you die. But if your will isn’t legally valid, those wishes might not actually be carried out, and instead the laws of “intestate succession” would apply, meaning that the state decides who gets your stuff, and it’s very likely not to be who you would choose.
  • Kobe Bryant’s Untimely Death Highlights the Vital Need for Estate Planning at All Ages

    As you no doubt already know, on January 26, 2020, basketball legend Kobe Bryant was killed in a helicopter crash on a wooded hillside 30 miles north of Los Angeles. Also killed in the tragic accident was his 13-year-old daughter Gianna, and seven other passengers, who were friends and colleagues of Kobe and his family. The exact cause of the crash remains under investigation.
  • 7 Events That Necessitate a Review of Your Estate Plan

    Even if you put a totally solid estate plan in place, it can end up proving worthless if it’s not properly updated. Estate planning is not a one-and-done type of deal: It should continuously evolve along with your life circumstances.

    No matter who you are, your life will inevitably change: families change, laws change, assets change, and goals change. In the absence of any major life events, we recommend reviewing your plan annually to make sure its terms are up to date.
  • 4 Things Trusts Can Do That Wills Can’t

    Both wills and trusts are estate planning documents that can be used to pass your wealth and property to your loved ones upon your death. However, trusts come with some distinct advantages over wills that you should consider when creating your plan.
  • The SECURE Act’s Impact On Estate and Retirement Planning—Part 2

    In the first part of this series, we discussed the potential ramifications the SECURE ACT has for your estate and retirement planning. Here, we’ll look more deeply into additional strategies you may want to consider in light of the new legislation.
  • The SECURE Act’s Impact On Estate and Retirement Planning—Part 1

    On January 1, 2020, the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act (SECURE Act) went into effect, and it represents the most significant retirement-planning legislation in decades.

    Indeed, the changes ushered in by the SECURE Act have dramatic implications for both your retirement and estate planning strategies—and not all of them are positive. While the law includes a number of taxpayer-friendly measures to boost your ability to save for retirement, it also contains provisions that could have disastrous effects on planning strategies families have used for years to protect and pass on assets contained in retirement accounts.
  • The Tax Cut & Jobs Act Drastically Alters the Tax Consequences of Divorce

    The Tax Cuts & Jobs Act (TCJA) made sweeping changes to exemptions, deductions, and credits for your family’s federal income taxes. But one major change that you might not have noticed is the way the law altered the potential tax consequences of divorce.
  • How “Shopping Around” for An Estate Plan Could Leave Your Family With an Expensive, Unintended Mess

    Maybe you’ve heard that before investing in a professional service you should “get three estimates.”  While often this is wise advice, it’s actually a bad idea when it comes to estate planning. This article explains why and how you can ensure you get the most efficient and affordable plan possible for your family without shopping estate planning lawyers the way you may think.
  • 4 Estate Planning Must-Haves for Unmarried Couples—Part 2

    Most people tend to view estate planning as something only married couples need to worry about. However, estate planning can be even more critical for those in committed relationships who are unmarried.
    Because your relationship with one another is frequently not legally recognized, if one of you becomes incapacitated or when one of you dies, not having any planning can have disastrous consequences. Your age, income level, and marital status makes no difference—every adult needs to have some fundamental planning strategies in place if you want to keep the people you love out of court and out of conflict.
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